Blended and Personalized Learning

Many schools adopt the blended learning model to obtain a more personalized approach to learners. In your experience, to what extent can blended models help achieve personalized learning? Please share concrete examples.

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5 comments
Carolyn Tarr's picture
Carolyn Tarr
From our beginning three years ago, Kepler has been deeply committed to finding the right balance of time between online and in-person learning. While we are continuously learning what the perfect mix is, we have been lucky enough to try-out a number of different blended learning approaches. We have experimented with leveraging MOOCs to offer a flipped classroom where the MOOC viewing serves as the homework (content acquisition) and the classroom serves as the application. Additionally, we offer MOOC Clubs which allow students to self-select the most important content they will take away from a MOOC and practice implementation in the classroom. Kepler also leverages free online software and tutorials to support the acquisition of technology skills and to increase anytime access points for students. Outside of this, with our terrific partner, College for America, and their competency-based degree program, students are able to complete degree work at their own pace. This type of flexibility through an online forum and supported with our on-the-ground course facilitators has accelerated the pace at which students can earn their degrees, while simultaneously creating opportunities for employment while completing a Bachelors degree.
reply - Aug 31, 2016
OOI Ching Ya's picture
OOI Ching Ya
Hi Alexis! Thanks very much for the great share. May I know the location of your school? Perhaps you can further explain why does learning not take place "when the student is accustomed to use mobile devices for many things, but not learn". We would love to learn from your insights!
reply - Jul 03, 2015
Alexis Tejedor De León's picture
Alexis Tejedor De León
At present we are conducting an exploratory investigation into the b-learning for teaching basic algebra in adolescents. The expectations are high, especially when the student is accustomed to use mobile devices for many things, but not learn; very mature, and be proactive cooperation is required
reply - Jul 02, 2015
OOI Ching Ya's picture
OOI Ching Ya
Truly appreciate your bottom-up organic initiative to look into the needs of students with disabilities. "We took it step by step and began with intensive goal setting sessions, then developed individualized schedules that included home based service, online learning, Skype sessions with teachers, block scheduling outside of our school bell schedule, summer and after school hours, and whatever else the student needed to be successful. " -- We think we can learn this approach from you to refine our high school Mentor System and also to introduce it to our middle school extended learning program. Thank you very much, Becca! :D
reply - Jul 02, 2015
Becca Leech's picture
Becca Leech
Our school started small with a program targeting students with disabilities who are most at-risk for dropping out during 11th and 12th grade. It made sense to start with students who were having high absenteeism related to physical and mental health issues. We took it step by step and began with intensive goal setting sessions, then developed individualized schedules that included home based service, online learning, Skype sessions with teachers, block scheduling outside of our school bell schedule, summer and after school hours, and whatever else the student needed to be successful. The program has grown and is expanding this year. A similar general education initiative is revving up and we work together. I think the secret was that it was not imposed on us from above, but allowed to take shape in a more organic, grassroots way. If interested, you can see more on my blog at www.readyforthenewworld.worpress.com
reply - Jul 01, 2015