Special Needs Education

Special Needs Education

Children with special needs often miss out in the main discussions on education, yet they are the most vulnerable student populations. How can we begin to include them in the discussion? What role can technology play to ensure that they are not left behind?

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5 comments
Daniel Marc Lanthier's picture
Daniel Marc Lanthier
I heartily agree with all the comments above. In Pakistan there are over 1 million deaf children of school age, yet less than 5% attend school! Our organisation Family Educational Services Foundation (FESF) is seeking to bridge this gap via its Deaf Reach Program. 6 Deaf Reach Schools and Training Centers provide free education for deaf students and is the only branch network of schools reaching out into rural areas for special needs children. We have developed a 5,000 Pakistan Sign Language visual dictionary, available on line, phone app, dvd and books. In collaboration with WISE Winning Award SuenaLetras, another software was created to facilitate our deaf students. So much to be done. Such collaborations are propelling us forward to reach the out of school deaf children in Pakistan. Daniel
reply - Apr 19, 2017
Special Attention Project's picture
Special Attention Project
This is good. Globally in education development there is not enough attention for special educational needs. We work in Ghana for children with Specific Learning Difficulties, in response to findings that a considerable portion of children living in the streets had actually dropped out of school because of difficulties in learning and behaviour. Lack of understanding and help is the 'trigger' for school drop-out, which eventually leads children to run away from home when their families do not understand them either. They start a new, free life in the streets and miss out on basic education. We provide individualised education and help by re-integration for this group of children, and also advocate for inclusive education, create awareness, do training and develop learning solutions for children with specific learning difficulties. We have contributed to Ghana's Inclusive Education Policy, and learners with lesser known or 'invisible' disabilities are included. However, there is a huge capacity need for implementing inclusive interventions for learners with varied needs across the education system. The goal of 'all children to school' will be difficult/impossible to achieve without systems that are fully inclusive (SDG4). This should be a much stronger theme in development conversation and planning. Very often, grassroot organisations working for the excluded and vulnerable lack the loud voice to make themselves heard. We need platforms and partners to drive this and get it placed much higher on the global agenda.
reply - Mar 17, 2017
admin's picture
Admin Admin
Thank you for giving your insight on this pertinent issue and for telling us what your project does. I would like to invite you to create your profile on WISE ed.hub so that you can share with other practitioners your knowledge and experience.
reply - Apr 06, 2017
Silvana Veinberg's picture
Silvana Veinberg
Hello everyone! I am really glad to notice that education of children with special needs is included in this discussion. I have attended the Wise Summit twice. Last time our project Videobooks in Sign Language for deaf children was one of the Award winners (www.videolibros.org). The money award allowed us to start a new project: International Videobooks. The same books we had created in Argentine Sign Language, will soon be available in other sign languages: Uruguayan, Paraguayan and Mexican Sign Languages. Deaf children and the community at large are often misunderstood and their real needs are not taken into account. Since more than 90% of the deaf population has hearing parents and hearing teachers who do not know sign language, they grow up isolated, with very little information, and almost illiterate, since they do not acquire a natural language from their surrounding in their early ages. This is why we promote reading through Sign Language. Education of deaf children requires a deep understanding of their linguistic and cultural situation, to be able to propose real and rich solutions, many of which include the use of technology. Sign language is a visual language, and thus, the only way to transmit and to register this language is through video recording. The deaf community around the world is using technology to communicate, to develop educational materials, to create new and artistic ways of expression. Education will be really comprehensive when Summits and Congresses related to education and to different matters around the world include the “voice” of the deaf community and make their participation possible through qualified Sign Language interpreters. If the voices of the most vulnerable groups are not included in the conversations about the future of education, there will be more children excluded within the educational system than those that fit the standards imposed always by the dominant piece of the population.
reply - Mar 01, 2017
Dr.Shpresa Xhakli's picture
Dr.Shpresa Xhakli
Hello ,yes indeed they do miss out on everything. I was participating on WISE conference2014,when nothing was there on special ed.-autism and made a comment,on 2015 i had a small group getting together and exchanging the information that we had,but i do believe we need to start all out section on their needs.I am an MD, a mother of a 27 years old son with Autizmi and a founder of NGO Autism since 2009,in Kosovo.As of now we have 7 centers around towns. The center is the first ever,in Kosovo,helping kids with autism by improving behavior,providing support and raising awareness on a community and national level through education. Its supported through private fundraising.My role is to procure needed supplies as well organize/coordinate professional training for psychologist,teachers,and parents.We had organized several training's and workshops on ABA/VB(Applied Behavior Analysis/Verbal Behavior). From our charter class of 12 children,we have expanded and help over 100 children and as of now expanded to other towns,implementing 1:1 (1 psychologist-1 Child) ABA/VB applied model as well as providing continued professional education for our staff,to maintain up to date skills as well as learning resource centers for parents. I have visitet Shafallah Center in Doha,Qatar in 2015 and was speechless with all the success they have and services offered.I would like,if they spearhead and became the leader on the future WISE conference,on this issue. Otherwise,i had applied with the project to,this year,and just trying anyhow to help children with autism.Thank you and wish you success.
reply - Feb 28, 2017