Teachers and the Learning Process

Theme: Teachers

As an educator, how do you place students at the center of learning? How do you address their specific needs?

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12 comments
Vishal Talreja's picture
Vishal Talreja
In our experience with children at Dream a Dream, there have been a few things that have helped us keep children at the center of the learning process - Listening - Not just from the head but also from the heart; Not just to what is been said but also what is not been said. Building Trust - If a child can come up a share something that is bothering them without worrying about a backlash or being judged, we have created trust. Authentic Validation and Acknowledgement - Not just saying, "Good Job" but recognizing what is unique and special about each child and celebrating that. Creating Safe Learning Spaces - Not just physical but also emotionally safe spaces. Finally, Bringing Empathy in the classroom. All the above, keep the child at the center and create the most conducive learning space for the child.
reply - Dec 02, 2015
Basarat Kazim's picture
Basarat Kazim
Agreeing completely with the overarching suggestions above, I would like to add something very simple. The lessons where students are encouraged to fill the shoes of the people or problems they are learning about, in the case of the social sciences, and a sense of awe and wonder when it is the pure sciences, creates a charged and conducive learning environment. Different and varied responses come in and the classroom becomes a "happening" space.
reply - Nov 17, 2015
Brenda's picture
Brenda
By differentiating instruction I am able to assess and address the needs of students of varying academic strengths, behavior needs, and language development. In the rural context, teachers need tools and supports to help them identify and assist struggling students through appropriate modifications and grouping. Teachers need training, practice and coaching in activity based pedagogy to develop the skills to modify instruction and assessment according to individual student needs.
reply - Mar 10, 2015
Monica's picture
Monica
Each school, all ages, should start 30 minutes earlier to start the day with a meditation session of 30 minutes. Studies have shown positive outcomes for learning, including increased grades & concentration. Behaviour outcomes include lowering bullying, improved mental health & less disruption during class time.
reply - Oct 12, 2014
Boped's picture
Boped reply - Oct 12, 2014
476d0685d3eaa97c4a795eda56470eed's picture
José Ignacio González-Aller
It is very important to adapt teaching to the kind of children we are working with. For example, in a rural context, we need to take into account that our students cannot spend their whole time in class, as they parents may need them to help at home or long distances may prevent them from going to school on a regular basis. To avoid dropouts we must adapt timetables and curricula to their lives. A system in which students alternate one week of study in the classroom and one week of study at home may be a good option.
reply - Aug 18, 2014
Judie Gade's picture
Judie Gade
Each school, all ages, should start 30 minutes earlier to start the day with a meditation session of 30 minutes. Studies have shown positive outcomes for learning, including increased grades & concentration. Behaviour outcomes include lowering bullying, improved mental health & less disruption during class time.
reply - Jun 27, 2014
Daniel Siles's picture
Daniel Siles
Dear Judie, I'd be interested in those studies you mention on the impact of meditation upon grades and concentration. Where could I find them? Thanks a lot in advance.
reply - Dec 09, 2015
Swapan Khan's picture
Swapan Khan
Twice a week, we extend school hours by three hours to allow children to pursue practical activities of their interest. It could be an extra-curricular activity like sport or music or linked to academics like practical activities in the Science lab.
reply - Jun 25, 2014
Mary Kabati's picture
Mary Kabati
1. Planning your session well, for me who train Teachers/ Para Teachers, I need to identify gaps in their classroom practices, and that where I start in planning for an informed training session. This approach is always interesting as the participants are eager to learn on how best they can make their practices be child centered, interesting, participatory and achievable in terms of planned objectives. Working with a group which works with young children is very rewarding. 2. I as well work with parents who are real very innovative in supporting children in their learning process, the most interesting part is that of developing learning materials, children learn through play.
reply - Jun 19, 2014
Brenda's picture
Brenda
I agree and would add knowing student (teachers as students in this case) interests goes a long ways toward helping them make meaning of the content.
reply - Mar 10, 2015
Rana Dajani's picture
Rana Dajani
1. By consulting with them on what they need 2. By exploring the job market to find out what qualifications are potential employers looking for 3. Tailoring curricula to the teach the students the needs identified above. 4. Exploring with the student new methods of teaching using for example social media since they are more adapt at using it. Put them in charge of organizing learning through social media 5. Encourage peer learning. 6. Encourage service learning as a tool for students to explore a particular theme to discover their areas of strength and weakness 7. Using problem based learning as an approach so that students can think on their own and come up with their own conclusions
reply - Jun 12, 2014